Andrew Bradford

The story of Charlie and Kathy Bradford

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Ostriches, Penguins and Human Rights

Posted on May 12, 2017 at 10:40 AM Comments comments (1)

Two days in Cape Town


At the end of March Marilyn and I visited Cape Town. One Monday morning we took the ferry to Robben Island, the bleak outpost in the Indian Ocean where the Apartheid regime, like the British Empire and Dutch empires before it incarcerated its political prisoners.


The R...

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Happy Days are Here Again

Posted on March 9, 2017 at 10:15 AM Comments comments (0)

The first thing that Elliott Roosevelt did when he arrived at the Democratic Party's convention in Chicago in 1932 was to make sure that the curtains were fully drawn across the front of the stage. He had to ensure that the audience of thousands were not in a position to sneak a view of what he had to do in thirty minutes time.


Satisfied that his actions would not be visible, the twenty-two year old son of the former governor of New York then introduced himself to the sound ...

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Is "the Truth" a broken concept?

Posted on February 15, 2017 at 5:55 AM Comments comments (3)

In March 1942 George Orwell wrote in his diary: " All propaganda is lies, even when one is telling the truth". In 2016, Oxford Dictionaries declared "post-truth" to be the word of the year. Here are some examples of Post-truth:


• Obama founded ISIS

• George Bush was behind the 9/11 attacks


I wonder what Orwell would have had to say about this subject?


Since Donald Trump's election as President of the United States...

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From Wallington to Willingdon

Posted on January 12, 2017 at 8:55 AM Comments comments (0)

Most of the scenes in George Orwell's Animal Farm take place in the Big Barn of Manor Farm, Willingdon. Orwell never states in which county Animal Farm is set, but it is almost certain that Wilingdon is based on the tiny Hertfordshire village of Wallington, near Baldock, where Orwell lived on and off from 1936 to 1944.


Small villages and towns such as Haworth and Hawkshead are today almost entirely defined by their connections with the Brontes and Beatrix Potter, but Wall...

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Tales2Tell - new anthology by members of Broxbourne U3A Creative Writing and Poetry Group

Posted on October 21, 2016 at 9:05 AM Comments comments (0)

I am a member of the Boxbourne U3A Creative Writing and Poetry Group, and am dlighted to tell you all that we have just published our second volume of short, stories, poems and memoirs - Tales2Tell.


Tales2Tell costs £4.50 plus postage, and is available here. All proceeds will be donated to Macmillan Cancer Care.

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You Rarely Meet Anyone on the Pennine Way

Posted on July 18, 2016 at 5:30 AM Comments comments (1)

Last month, my friend Steve and I walked forty four miles of the Pennine Way, from Bellingham, Northumberland to Kirk Yetholm in the Scottish Borders. The Pennine Way ends at the Border Hotel, Kirk Yetholm, but Steve and I have only walked just over half of the almost 300 mile route. We started five years ago and only spend about three days a year walking this beautiful but arduous national trail. We hope to finish before another five years is out.


We decided to walk Sunday...

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Didn't it Rain

Posted on February 18, 2016 at 5:05 AM Comments comments (0)

Sister Rosetta Tharpe was an American gospel singer, songwriter, guitarist and recording artist. Born on a cotton plantation in 1915, she became gospel music's first great recording star. Known as "the godmother of rock and roll" She was an early influence on, Johnny Cash, Chuck Berry, Elvis Presley, Led Zeppelin and the Rolling Stones. Her career peaked in the 1940s.

By the 1964 her career was in decline, she was broke, and in poor health. But when Mick Jagger cited her as a ...

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Before There Were Supermarkets

Posted on October 8, 2015 at 9:30 AM Comments comments (3)

Before there were supermarkets there were corner shops and counter-service grocery chains.


When I was a kid we lived just across the road from Mrs Scott's corner shop that sold all manner of tinned and packeted foods and household items, as well as butter, cheese and ham, fresh vegetables, a little fruit, sacks of firewood and Coalite ( a kind of smokeless coal I think, but it wouldn't meet today's definition of "smokeless"). The shop was a converted terraced house, and the ...

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More family history

Posted on September 14, 2015 at 6:40 PM Comments comments (0)

In "Live Eels and Grand Pianos" there's a chapter about my Auntie Floss and her companion Auntie Nellie. I tried at the time to get pictures of them in their Salvation Army uniforms, but failed. Enfield Archives have now unearthed this picture from 1946.

 

Nellie is fifth from the left in the front row, Floss is seventh from left. Really glad to have found this p...

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Review of BBC Three's "Don't Take My Baby" by Jack Thorne

Posted on July 21, 2015 at 5:25 AM Comments comments (0)

Every year, an estimated 3,000 children are removed from disabled couples in the UK by Childrens' Services. "Don't Take my Baby", first shown on BBC Three on July 20 2015, dramatises the story of one couple, Tom and Anna, as they set about the task of proving that they can be capable parents.


Tom (Adam Long) is partially sighted, as a result of an unnamed condition that he has inherited from his father, and Anna (Ruth Madeley) has a congenital muscle wasting disease. When sh...

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